What To Know Before You Declare Personal Bankruptcy

Anyone who files for bankruptcy has had feelings of stress and worry. That is usually due to lack of knowledge about what bankruptcy means and what the ramifications of bankruptcy are. Here are just a few of the things you should know about bankruptcy, so that you can remain calm and positive about your financial life.


Get a plan in place for after your bankruptcy is over. Your debt will be forgiven, but you have to find a way to make sure that your financial picture will recover. Set definite goals so that you are always working toward a financial future that will never get you in this position again.

Consider hiring an attorney who specializes in personal bankruptcy. Although most states allow you to file for bankruptcy without a lawyer, your case could be dismissed if you don't fill out your paperwork correctly, and you may need to file additional motions to protect your property or discharge certain debts. A bankruptcy attorney can help ensure that you get the outcome you hope for when you file.

Evaluate your consultation with any lawyer by the way he or she handled the consult. Consider the length of your consult. If it lasted less than 15 minutes or it was with an assistant rather than an actual lawyer conducting the consult, this could signal that lawyer is probably not the best choice. You want someone that takes the time to handle your case personally, and you want to get your money's worth. You should also shy away from those lawyers who pressure you with phone calls or try convincing you immediately after a consultation by getting pushy.



Do not feel embarrassed or guilty about filling for bankruptcy. Many people fear that they will be treated as second class citizens after they declare themselves bankrupt. However, this is not the case. The option to 'declare yourself bankrupt' was developed by the government to enable assistance to be given to people who find themselves overwhelmed with debt and in need of a fresh start. Last year, over 1.4 million people filed bankruptcy and the majority of them are now living a happy, debt-free life. So, there is no need for you to be afraid of bankruptcy stigma.

Don't be tempted to race toward a bankruptcy without taking time to make sure it is the right thing for you to do. Perhaps consolidating your existing debt can make it easier to manage. Bankruptcy is a long process that can be stressful. It will have a major effect on your credit as time goes on. So, consider bankruptcy only as a last resort when you have no other choice.

Be safe and hire an attorney for help. There are many websites these days that claim to walk you through the process of filing bankruptcy on your own. It is cheaper than using an attorney to get you through this time, but it leaves a lot of room for error. This is not something that you want to take chances on.

Be prepared to complete some mandatory courses. When https://www.forbes.com/sites/lizryan/2015/03/01/how-to-write-your-first-pain-letter/ file for bankruptcy, the court will require that you successfully complete two mandatory courses, a credit counseling course and a debtor education course. Both of these courses can be completed online for a nominal fee, and while they are not too difficult, it is important that you are prepared for them.

Make sure that you fully understand the implications of declaring yourself bankrupt. Once you have filed for bankruptcy, you will find it difficult to secure any credit at all. While you may not see that consequence as a huge problem at the moment, if you wish to purchase a home in the future, or lease an automobile, you are probably going to need the credit.

Check all of your paperwork before filing, even if you used an attorney. While attorneys can be irreplaceable guides when it comes to personal bankruptcy, they often deal with multiple cases simultaneously. It's in your best interest, as its your financial future, to check all paperwork before it gets submitted.

Find out if you can use Chapter 13 bankruptcy, as it may help you better than the other laws. In most states, Chapter 13 bankruptcy law stipulates that you must have under $250,000 of unsecured debt and a steady income. You can keep personal possessions, as well as real estate, while paying into a debt consolidation system. This repayment period usually lasts from three to five years. If you make your payments faithfully during that time, any remaining unsecured debt will be eliminated. Remember that if check out here fail to make any of the payments on time, the court may dismiss your case.

When meeting with a personal bankruptcy lawyer, be sure you have all of the necessary paperwork with you. This will make the whole filing process go much easier and quicker. Some of the paperwork you should have with you includes loan documents, credit card bills, and any other relevant financial documents.

Do not cosign on any type of loan during or after your bankruptcy. Because you cannot file for bankruptcy again for many years, you will be on the hook for the debt if the person for whom you are cosigning is unable to meet his or her financial obligation. You must do whatever you can to keep your record clean.

Be completely up front and honest about your situation and assets to avoid courts from dismissing your case. If the court catches you deliberately hiding assets or income, it can bar you from filing and even refilling for bankruptcy on debts that you have listed within the petition. This makes it impossible to remove debts.

When selecting a lawyer for personal bankruptcy, do not be afraid to ask questions. Bring a written list to your first consultation so that none of your questions go unanswered. It can be intimidating to speak to an attorney, and having a list will ascertain that you don't forget to ask certain questions.

If you act early enough, you may be able to take advantage of Chapter 13 bankruptcy, instead of Chapter 7. Chapter 7 is the traditional "liquidation" bankruptcy, which will involve selling off your assets. In contrast, Chapter 13 is a repayment bankruptcy. You will have to pay off a portion of your debt, but you can hang onto your property.

Don't let bill collectors mislead you. When you discuss bankruptcy with some bill collectors, they may tell you that bankruptcy will not affect them, and you will still have to pay them. They are not being honest, all of your bills can be covered depending on the bankruptcy option that you fiel.

Always be honest in reporting all income, assets and debts when filing bankruptcy. If you hide any financial information, whether it is intentional or accidental, you run the risk of being barred from filing bankruptcy on those debts listed in your original bankruptcy petition in the future, which means you will have no relief from your financial burdens.

There are bankruptcy attorneys that are solely responsible for finding out laws associated with this sort of claim. Not everyone who files for bankruptcy is irresponsible or poor, so do not feel bad! Remember the tips in this article, so you know how to handle this situation with your head held high.

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